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daughter not motivated
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drmommy



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 164

Post daughter not motivated Reply with quote
Hi, I have a beautiful 12 year old, who is not a lazy girl (!), but when it comes to school, she drags her feet. I did take her out of public school at the end of 5th grade, so I am almost re-teaching her how to read. I am keeping up the course plans, but have felt the need to slow down a bit with her. How do I stretch out the plans, but still have her graduate on time (she is worried about that), and without just adding more goof-around time? I work part-time, so I have her do the work that doesn't need supervision (vocab, etc), but teach the hard stuff (science, etc) when I am home.

Any suggestions would be helpful. She really has a hard time keeping up with literature...should I use the elementary plans, or push her through the jr high? She is in 7th grade. Also, she lags behind in history, and just doesn't remember anything.

She is a sweet, helpful girl, but I am definitely seeing the fruits of not homeschooling earlier (impossible before).

Any comments would be greatly appreciated!
Sat Jul 11, 2009 5:43 am View user's profile Send private message
Marita Vargas



Joined: 05 Oct 2007
Posts: 149

Post Reply with quote
One thing you might want to do is focus on those areas where your daughter has weaknesses. Try not to overwhelm her by having her do too much. Pare down her assignments and then have her pre-read the questions before reading the assignments. She should take notes by writing down one main or key idea per section (Science, History). Have her review her notes before moving on to the next assignment. All of these practices aid retention.

History should be taught as a story. If you have time, play a recorded book on the period, a good historical novel or children's version of the story based on the time period under study, in the car or after dinner. Have her look at costumes or architecture of the time period studied.

You are welcomed to use the Elementary Literature books for her. If you do that, have her pay close attention to the elements of fiction (exposition, complication or problem, rising action, climax, resolution. She should be able to talk about the story in those terms.

Remember, there are no 8th grade graduation requirements. If she needs remediation, by all means, help her to catch-up rather than race through material.


God bless,


Kolbe Advisors

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Marita Vargas
Academic Advisor
Kolbe Academy Home School
Mon Jul 13, 2009 8:58 am View user's profile Send private message
Marita Vargas



Joined: 05 Oct 2007
Posts: 149

Post Reply with quote
One thing you might want to do is focus on those areas where your daughter has weaknesses. Try not to overwhelm her by having her do too much. Pare down her assignments and then have her pre-read the questions before reading the assignments. She should take notes by writing down one main or key idea per section (Science, History). Have her review her notes before moving on to the next assignment. All of these practices aid retention.

History should be taught as a story. If you have time, play a recorded book on the period, a good historical novel or children's version of the story based on the time period under study, in the car or after dinner. Have her look at costumes or architecture of the time period studied.

You are welcomed to use the Elementary Literature books for her. If you do that, have her pay close attention to the elements of fiction (exposition, complication or problem, rising action, climax, resolution. She should be able to talk about the story in those terms.

Remember, there are no 8th grade graduation requirements. If she needs remediation, by all means, help her to catch-up rather than race through material.


God bless,


Kolbe Advisors

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Marita Vargas
Academic Advisor
Kolbe Academy Home School
Mon Jul 13, 2009 8:58 am View user's profile Send private message
drmommy



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 164

Post Reply with quote
Thank you Marita! I will definitely try those suggestions. I was stressing because we are at the end of our quarter, and we haven't tackled the Civil War completely (and this is SO important!), and did not get the two books done for literature, because she did not understand them.

OK. We were worried about graduating high school! Sounds silly, and it is MY problem, but I am worried if I go down that slightly slippery slope, all will be lost and we will be so far behind. I am naturally worried that she will also take the easy way out.

Anyways, thanks for responding!
Mon Jul 13, 2009 12:57 pm View user's profile Send private message
Megan Lengyel



Joined: 08 Aug 2006
Posts: 2443
Location: Alpharetta, GA; formerly, Napa, CA; originally St. Louis, MO

Post Reply with quote
Okay well there ARE graduation requirements for high school, but you can always start fresh with high school. The JH program (7th and 8th) is preparing students for our rigorous high school program (Summa). You might decide to do the Magna or Standard diploma anyway, which have less requirements and at least allow you more breathing room. At the same time, i don't want you to lose your motivation to keep that bar raised for her. So perhaps it is good that you know that you have lots of wiggle room with us, but that she doesn't know Smile. That allows you to keep the bar where you want it and for her to keep reaching.

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Megan Lengyel
Kolbe Academy Home School
Online Academy Director
Mon Jul 13, 2009 6:04 pm View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
drmommy



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 164

Post Reply with quote
thank you, this really helped. I feel like I have to teach her all over again, starting with the end of 4th grade...I feel like she did not learn too much in her school-but, I am thankful I was able to homeschool when I did. We are taking our time more, especially in reading and literature. It is like her head is in the clouds...I guess that is also part of adolescence!!

I appreciate your help and input. Of course, if there are any moms wanting to comment, feel free.....!!!
Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:06 pm View user's profile Send private message
rjrmommy



Joined: 03 Dec 2007
Posts: 92

Post Reply with quote
I don't have children this age yet but I did work as a university admissions counselor for 10 years. If she is planning to attend college, you might want to take an extra year of remediation before entering high school. Personally, I think it would be better to enter high school well-prepared than to struggle throughout high school and miss out on some opportunities because of low grades or not being able to complete the coursework. There's no shame in recognizing an area of difficulty and really spending some time on it in order to succeed later but I think now is the time to do it before she starts the high school coursework. And, quite possibly, once she catches up in these areas she might fly through and be able to catch up to graduate "on time". The "on time" thing would definitely not be my goal though.
Wed Jul 15, 2009 7:52 am View user's profile Send private message
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